Out of this country

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Here are some thoughts on North Korea from the always illuminating Randall Parker. The manifesto of this blog to go where few have gone before. So I stay away from foreign policy because it is so done. That being said, Randall is a smart guy who tends to look at things from a different perspective than the blogosphere herd (though I would call him a hawk of sorts, though I come from an isolationist libertarian background, so my definition might not be typical).

Read Randall’s post titled Consanguinity prevents Middle Eastern political development, and you’ll see what I mean. Can it hurt to take a break from orange juice for a little tropical drink mix?

Also, I will be writing on Islam & liberalism-soon, I promise! And I just got my first issue of my gift subscription to Foreign Affairs, so I might wander off target on occassion and add a little tang to the mix that is the warblogsophere….

2 Comments

  1. As well as effecting political development, I have been wondering for a while is consanguinity largely responsible for the lower IQ’s in India, Pakistan and the Middle East. I have read it does reduce intelligence, and over dozens of generations surely the cumulative effect would be sizeable. Of coures with Jews, who were less consanguinous anyway, eugenic mating would have outwayed any negative effect(in relation to intelligence). In contrast, the great consanguinity, along with black miscegenation amongst Arabs may have far outwayed the eugenic effects of concubinage, a practice that may have greatly boosted East Asian intelligence. Any thoughts?

  2. I think the problem with so much foreign policy blogging is that a lot of it is just news reporting with some ranting added in. I try to discuss the root causes of problems and why some problems have no easy solution. Too much blogging on politics amounts to ranting for one’s faction and one’s ideology. Well, there are very difficult problems out there coming at us from foreign lands and we need to come to realize just how difficult some of them are to solve.

    Razib, yes, a lot of people are covering foreign policy. But few are trying to identify the basic questions about it or better policy solutions.

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