BIBLE STUDY

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I read some of that scary ‘Christian racialist’ stuff that was linked to, and I see that we Europeans are accused of not being sufficiently religious.

Actually, I do read the Bible from time to time. Here are some of the texts you won’t remember from Sunday school:

Genesis 6: 2-4
Genesis 20: 12
Exodus 22: 18
Exodus 33: 21-23
Numbers 12: 1
Numbers 15: 35
Numbers 16: 30-36
Numbers 31: 17-18
Deuteronomy 20: 10-18
Deuteronomy 23: 1-2
Judges 21: 10-14 and 20-21
2 Kings 2: 23-24
Mark 6: 3

Read and learn!

DAVID BURBRIDGE

12 Comments

  1. There’s also that odd little bit about Baalam. (numbers 22-24, 31)

  2. You think these passages are unknown to Christians and Jews? Elijah and the bears? References to Jesus’ sisters? The tough directives given to the Jews about people they conquered? This is all studied, maybe not in kids’ Sunday school but by adults. And it is discussed. Never think you can “out-Bible” a fundamentalist!

  3. The Bible is actually quite an endless source of fascination. The
    Skeptic’s Annotated Bible points out last every contradiction, absurdity, freaky bits, and homo-hating rants in one place. It’s actually quite an impressive piece of work once you adjust to the sneering tone of the whole thing.

  4. You might enjoy the Resident’s CD “Wormwood – A Book of Bloody Bible Stories”. Excellent stuff.

    You can get it at: http://www.noside.com/catalog/CatalogAlbum_01.asp?Album_ID=72

  5. >> The Skeptic’s Annotated Bible points out last every contradiction, absurdity, freaky bits, and homo-hating rants in one place.

    The problem with zealots, such as the people behind the “Skeptic’s Annotated Bible” is that they shoot themselves in the foot by mixing their liberal ideology, atheism and anti-Christianity with legitimate issues regarding the Bible.

    Example of biased commentary: “And therefore did the Jews persecute Jesus, and sought to slay him, because he had done these things on the sabbath day.” is described as “Anti-Semitic”. But this would be anti-Semitic if it was actually false, and one cannot make that assertion unless they have some evidence to base that assertion on.

    Example of bad translation: “Jesus speaks rudely to his mother, saying: “Woman, what have I to do with thee?” 2:4″. If you’re going to attack the Bible, you at least need to know Greek. Correct translation: “Woman, what concern is that to you or to me?” (NRSV) TI\ E)MOI\ KAI\ SOI/, GU/NAI

    Someone ought to write the Skeptic’s Annotated Skeptic’s Annotated Bible.

  6. I agree with Dienekes. There’s much legitimate criticism that can be applied to the bible, but the “Skeptics Bible” certainly goes for quantity instead of quality.

  7. To Dick: I think you’ll find it was Elisha, not Elijah. Outbibled?

  8. Interesting Dienekes as that is the King James. What’s the best translation in your opinion?

  9. What’s the big deal? I read these things uncensored and on my own when I was ten yrs. old, as have many kids through the ages. They didn’t teach those particular stories in Catholic school but contrary to popular belief, we were usually given a bible around the age of six. It was most instructional, full of great, grizzly stories–otherwise, how could you get through it? It did make me wonder, but I had a certain perspective. The Old Testament is mainly the history of a particular people, replete with the moraes and customs of times, struggling to interpret and implement new ethical teachings they believe to be sent by messengers of God. Ditto New Testament though that is more focussed on the spiritual teachings. The cynical who believe religions, which ramble on from century to century, are a conspiracy, ought to concentrate on the military/industrial complex {ala Eisenhower’s warning) which really is. Otherwise their point is the same old
    same old, from Voltaire to Lenin to … well, the authors of the latest Cynic’s Bible. BTW, a question for the Greek scholars–what is the etymology of the world “cynic”? I heard something but don’t know how to interpret it.

  10. >> Interesting Dienekes as that is the King James. What’s the best translation in your opinion?

    I don’t really know since it’s all Greek to me anyway. The King James is probably loved in the English-speaking world because it’s traditional and inspirational-sounding.

    I just have a New Revised Standard Version which is annoying because they translate things in a PC manner, e.g., brothers->brothers+sisters. But at least they always give the original in a note and I have not seen any great discrepancies so far. The Orthodox Church in English-speaking countries uses the King James and the Revised Standard Version (last time I checked). The latter contains all the “deuterokanonic” books used in the OC that are missing in Catholic-Protestant bibles.

  11. >> BTW, a question for the Greek scholars–what is the etymology of the world “cynic”

    Cynic is from the Greek word for dog KU/WN. The first Cynic was Antisthenes, who was a pupil of Socrates. He used to teach at a certain palaestra in Athens whose name I’m forgetting but which had the word “dog” in it. Hence, Cynic, as Zeno was a Stoic, because he taught at the “poikile stoa”, Plato was academic because he taught at the grove sacred to Academus, etc. The cynics also had a back-to-nature philosophy and despised ostentation in clothing/food etc. So they were made fun of and called “dogs” as well.

  12. Thank you. That is a more comprehensive explanation than the one I had.

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