Vox Clamantis in Deserto

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Email this to someoneTweet about this on Twitter

Joanne Jacobs points to a new blogger, Newoldteacher, a graduate student in education. Hers is a voice crying out in the wilderness of education graduate programs:

My professor is a real history professor from the real university I attend. He specializes in modern Islam and European colonialism in the Middle East. He wears bow-ties, tells us we’re wrong, criticizes us when we stay stupid things, and generally emits an air of effortless superiority. It’s absolutely awesome. Finally, someone who values knowledge, who doesn’t believe it’s just a useless jumble of unrelated baubles. He’s brilliant, and it’s obvious that he’s brilliant because he knows so much. It’s not that he’s used “transfer skills” from critical thinking projects he did as a kid. No. He studied for god knows how long in libraries across America, the Middle East, and Europe. He learned other languages and lived in other cultures, and he just knows his shit. Today he gave a narrative of the last few years in American life that was brief but so incisive I felt I would tear up. I hate that my school doesn’t think this type of intellectualism is worth anything. The guy in my class who was so pro-constructivism, he said “our schools produce kids who are good at school.” First off, most of them don’t. Second, what is wrong with that?

Joanne note that Newoldteacher, who hopes to teach social studies, thinks it’s more valuable to know things than to be able to “make a model space station out of plastic pipes and rubber tubing.”

5 Comments

  1. Today he gave a narrative 
     
    I couldn’t figure out what point you were trying to make until I looked at her blog. The quote sounds like a parody of intellectualism.

  2. “He wears bow-ties, tells us we’re wrong, criticizes us when we stay stupid things, and generally emits an air of effortless superiority. It’s absolutely awesome. Finally, someone who values knowledge, who doesn’t believe it’s just a useless jumble of unrelated baubles. He’s brilliant, and it’s obvious that he’s brilliant because he knows so much.” 
     
    He may well be all that — and more — but I have always wondered about the legions of students over the years who fall in love with their professors and professors who fall in with adoring students. This sheds some light on the matter.

  3. And even if this is the case, at least there seems to be good reason to fall in love ;-)

  4. Quoting from the Vulgate on GNXP? Don’t let Dawkins catch you at it.

  5. Valuable to whom?

a