Swidden rice farming does not lead to high population density

Admixture on K = 5

I’ve been looking at the data from the recent Munda paper. Standard stuff, admixture, treemix, and f-statistics.The northern Munda samples were collected in Bangladesh. So I thought: I can test the hypothesis that the East Asian ancestry in Bangladesh is to a large part Santhal. After looking at it every which way, I think that in fact, the Munda may not have ever been very populous in much of northeast India. The Santhal is just not a good donor population to Bengalis, at least not when comparing mixes such as Dai + Tamil.

Additionally, the Santhal are really not that well modeled by mixing South Asians with any particular Southeast Asian group, though it works. I think that’s suggestive of the possibility that the Austro-Asiatic group which gave rise to the Munda don’t exist in their current form anywhere in Southeast Asia. Additionally, the Lao samples that are provided in the new paper I think may have Indian ancestry via admixture from Austro-Asiatic Mon or Khmer groups.

Basically, there is so much bidirectional gene flow that I think it’s really hard to get a grip on what’s going on. Additionally, the Burmese and northeast Indian populations (e.g., the Mizos) clearly have a strand of ancestry that derives from relatively recent migrants that came down from the region of eastern Tibet, and perhaps Sichuan or even further north. And this component shows up in Bengalis as well.

On top of this, there is the “Australo-Melanesian” substrate that is present all across Southeast Asia, and probably was present in modern southern China in the early Holocene, which has distant affinities with the “Ancient Ancestral South Indians” (AASI).

At this point, I keep my own counsel. But there may be an interesting story to tell related to how efficient and effective different forms of agriculture were, and how that interplayed with genes and language.

The main interesting thing about Bangladeshi genetics is how East Asian Bangladeshis are

Click to enlarge

 

I got a question about endogamy and Bangladeshis on of my other weblogs, as well as their relatedness to western (e.g., Iranian) and eastern (e.g., Southeast Asian) populations. Instead of talking, what do the data say? Most of you have probably seen me write about this before, but I think it might be useful to post again for Google (or Quora, as Quora seems to like my blog posts as references).

The 1000 Genomes project collected samples a whole lot of Bangladeshis in Dhaka. The figure at the top shows that the Bangladeshis overwhelmingly form a relatively tight cluster that is strongly shifted toward East Asians. There is one exception: about five individuals, several of which were collected right after each other (their sample IDs are sequential) who show almost no East Asian shift.

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How South Asian populations relate to each other

Since people asking me about this, and I’m running the South Asian Genotype Project, I thought I would post two non-PCA visualizations of how various South Asian groups relate to each other (along with a few outgroups).

The radial plot above is a neighbor-joining tree visualized from pairwise Fst statistics (basically a proxy for genetic distance).

I also used Treemix to generate a plot. You see the similar patterns as the one above, though the two methods are different. Treemix tests a bunch of models and sees how the data fit those models. The visualization of Fst is just a way of representing the summary statistic.

I added 5 migration edges to the plot to the right. Not sure if they add anything, but you can see that some of the nodes move around because they are so mixed.