Open Thread, 12/10/2018

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays!

Just a heads up that DNA Geeks is running a holiday sale on the microscopes with free shipping (until stocks are sold out).

Also, updating a plugin broke the site, so I had to deactivate and reactive all the plugins. For whatever reason, the ‘related posts’ plugin also no longer works. Does anyone click those links? Might have to find a replacement.

Models of archaic admixture and recent history from two-locus statistics.

Incidence of Dementia over Three Decades in the Framingham Heart Study. Decreased incidence.

China Launches First-Ever Mission to the Moon’s Farside.

Fourth Brown Pundits podcast, “the Golden Age of Islam”. Here are the iTunes and Stitcher links. Would appreciate subscriptions+reviews.

America’s New Religions. I dislike overuse of the term “religion.” And I’m generally skeptical of the idea of “political religion” as a useful term, as opposed just mass movement. But I think I”m coming around.

When it comes to religion, I take for granted that you’ve read a book like In Gods We Trust. That being said, I do wonder about the psychological research used to support some of the conclusions in the field of the cognitive anthropology of religion in the wake of the “replication crisis.” Some of the stuff, like depictions of eyes making you more ethical don’t seem to be robust findings.

On The Insight this week we talked Game of Thrones. Yes, I do think meiotic drive is the best rational explanation for the persistence of Valyrian characteristics.

More data from the Estonian Biocentre. Also, the title of a paper, “Multiple deeply divergent Denisovan ancestries in Papuans” which is clearly in review.

The presence and impact of reference bias on population genomic studies of prehistoric human populations.

Genetically Modified People Are Walking Among Us.

Contingency in the convergent evolution of a regulatory network: Dosage compensation in Drosophila.

Criticizing Islam is turned into “hate speech” on Facebook. The problem is that the “big platforms” like Twitter and Facebook are so big and diverse that it’s not that hard to “game them” and engage in speech policing. Facebook is really about family photos now. And Twitter is best done non-ironically if you have more than a trivial following.

George R.R. Martin takes time off from not writing his book to laud New York pizza.

Why We Miss the WASPs. The reactions seem to be driven by people who were not clear what the narrow connotations of “WASP” originally was.

Anti-Zionism Isn’t the Same as Anti-Semitism. I pretty much agree, though operationally the lines between ‘anti-Zionism’ and ‘anti-Semitism’ bleed over pretty easily.

Open Thread, 10/2/2018

I’m reading Ramesh Menon’s The Mahabharata: A Modern Reading before I go to sleep. If you are ignorant, the Mahabharata is about an epic poem that’s an order of magnitude longer than the Iliad or The Odyssey combined. Menon’s prose rendering seems to get some good marks, so I that’s not why I chose it. It’s not the most artful writing, but that’s not what I was looking for, nor would I appreciate it in any case.

My rationale for reading this two-fold. First, as someone who was raised on Bulfinch’s Mythology and has read Genesis in dozens of translations, I thought it was behoove me to become a bit more culturally fluent about brown stuff. Especially in light of the fact that I’m “tagged” on a “Hindu Twitter” thread every few weeks now (12+ hard science disciplines apparently prove the Mahabharata happened 25,000 years ago!).

Second, the age of Indian historical population genetics is coming to an end. Perhaps ten years from now people will be doing temporal transects of eastern Maharashtra, but the bigger framework will be nailed down soon enough. And real intellectual understanding is going to have to synthesize archaeology and mythology with the demographic inferences.

The Urbane Cowboys podcast now has had three Bengali American conservatives on. #representation You should subscribe (I might be on again to talk about CRISPR soon).

Browncast #3. I talk about Indian genetics.

Does DNA Make Us Who We Are? A reader of this weblog shouldn’t find anything new in this book. There are some technical issues in this book you might pick up, as well as airbrushing out of Eric Turkheimer citation. But I left that stuff out of the review since regular people won’t care or understand.

Plomin is definitely an enthusiast on some counts. But most of the book covers his career and views on behavior genetics.

Why There Will Not Be a Beige Future: Skin Color, Genetics, Race and Racism. Written for an audience less familiar with genetics. You shouldn’t need to read this. But some of you still don’t know what the breeder’s equation is.

The New Evolution Deniers. I haven’t read this piece, but people keep asking me about it. Plenty of biologists have these sorts of views from what I can tell, but they’re never going to say a word.

So that’s why this battle is lost in my opinion. I don’t really care. American culture is now a battle between different groups of propagandists who manipulate the levers of power. The rest is commentary, and positivism and critical-rationalism are dead in the broader culture. They only persist in the “inner party” of the elect. Truth is the real conspiracy….

The Harlot by the Side of the Road: Forbidden Tales of the Bible. Good book.

I’ve been defending Marc Lamont Hill’s right to speak and express his views, and retain his professional positions. Mostly because “free speech” really doesn’t matter unless you kind of detest the views you are defending…. So I guess I’ m still delusional and not a realist. I contain multitudes.

Inside the chaos and corruption of Tripoli, where militias rule the streets. We violated the “Pottery Barn rule.”

Mountain lion genomes provide insights into genetic rescue of inbred populations.

Ancient Yersinia pestis genomes from across Western Europe reveal early diversification during the First Pandemic (541-750). Last author “Krause.” You’ll be seeing that a lot related to historical genomics from this group in the near future. Ancient DNA is cheap enough that it can be used to resolve historical questions as opposed to shedding light on prehistory.

Simulation of Karyotype Evolution and Biodiversity in Asexual and Sexual Reproduction.

Sex differences in gene expression in the human fetal brain.

Open Thread, 11/26/2018

So Spencer and I talked to Antonio Regalado today for the podcast (Apple and Stitcher, should be live soon as I just pushed it). We talked way more about Brave New World than I was expecting. The engineering is moved further than I had realized.

Here are the show notes for the episode.

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface.

The Siberian unicorn lived at the same time as modern humans.

Robust estimation of recent effective population size from number of independent origins in soft sweeps.

Fire and Fire & Blood: 300 Years Before A Game of Thrones is a quick read.

Historical contingency shapes adaptive radiation in Antarctic fishes.

The Trouble With White Women: An Interview With Kyla Schuller.

Meet Denny, the ancient mixed-heritage mystery girl.

A vast 4,000-year-old spatial pattern of termite mounds.

On the Nature of Patriarchy.

Alice Dreger’s Middle Finger: Sex, Gender and Unhelpful Hair-Splitting.

What the Cult of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Got Wrong. The Right loves Ginsburg.

Woman who inherited fatal illness to sue doctors in groundbreaking case.

I was raised as a Native American. Then a DNA test rocked my identity. Dad “passed” as Native American. He was black American and Chinese American.

Regular Exercise May Keep Your Body 30 Years ‘Younger’.

Worldwide phylogeography and history of wheat genetic diversity.

Open Thread, 11/19/2018

I figure I should post the “Open Thread” sooner than later since people are using last week’s “Open Thread” to post stuff.

So I’m getting a copy of Fire & Blood: 300 Years Before A Game of Thrones tomorrow according to Amazon. But I have a legitimate reason to get this book: we’ll be talking about the “genetics of Game of Thrones” soon on The Insight, my podcast with Spencer Wells.

Finally recorded a second episode of the Brown Pundits podcast, where we talk about the woman imprisoned for blasphemy in Pakistan and colorism. Mostly it’s Zach talking to be honest since he has a lot more passion about these topics, especially the former one.

This guy is a legitimate University of Chicago biologist. What have you done with your life?


Demographic histories and genetic diversity acrosspinnipeds are shaped by human exploitation,ecology and life-history. Pinnipeds.

Genomic analysis of dingoes identifies genomic regions under reversible selection during domestication and feralization. An interesting thing is that dogs almost certainly descend from a wolf/wolf-like population, but when they go feral they don’t quite become wolves. Perhaps it would be different if they went feral in northern Eurasia. But the ones in tropical/mid-latitude zones that “de-domesticate” don’t become Eurasian wolves. Perhaps something to do with genetic variation lost, but I think some of it is different selection pressures.

Sigrid Johnson Was Black. A DNA Test Said She Wasn’t. The title comes from an early forensic test that probably used hundreds of ancestrally informative markers. If you read the whole thing you see that the results kept getting closer and closer to reality.

Psychology’s Replication Crisis Is Running Out of Excuses.

Middle Palaeolithic occupations in central Saudi Arabia during MIS 5 and MIS 7: new insights on the origins of the peopling of Arabia and Late Middle Pleistocene Levallois stone-tool technology in southwest China. The spread of non-Africans around ~60,000 was responsible for most of the non-African ancestry. But there were probably some “false dawns.”

In relation to Robert Plomin’s Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are probably worth it if you haven’t ever read behavior genetics. But really a lot of it is reemphasizing/reintroducing results from the field over the past generation. Hopefully will write review soon.

Super-smart designer babies could be on offer soon. But is that ethical? I suspect that the vast majority of the customers for many years will be focused on diseases. The best way to have tall and smart children is to select a tall and smart spouse. We might be talking about something different in the 2030s. I’m struck by how little discussion there is from bioethicists and geneticists about NIPT tests for stuff like Down Syndrome. They’re ubiquitous, but talk is limited generally to pro-life circles.

A friend told me that Conquerors: How Portugal Forged The First Global Empire is pretty good. I might quibble with the subtitle, but he confirms that the Portuguese were indeed huge dicks. The Iberians as a whole were brutal and nasty. Though not as nasty as the Anglo-Protestant “Black Legend” would imply. Mostly they didn’t follow the norms and rules which were present in parts of Asia and the New World between states and peoples.

Is anyone still getting 500 errors very often?

Happy Thanksgiving to Americans.

Open Thread, 11/12/2018

Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind is an interesting book. Very much on the side of Erasmus. Like the author, I do think Erasmus turned out to be a beautiful loser. But ideas and biographies can have second acts.

How the GOP Gave Up on Porn. Basically, the war was lost. The curious thing about the pervasiveness of porn today is that arguably in many ways our modern society is more prudish than that of the 1970s and 1980s when the political activity around obscenity was very active.

Population genomics of grey wolves and wolf-like canids in North America.

The Summer’s Most Unread Book Is… From 2014. People don’t seem to finish non-fiction. Though for a lot of nonfiction books you don’t have to read every chapter, and they are very loose in a narrative sense.

Outlaw King Is a Lot Better Than You’ve Heard.

Estimates of the Heritability of Human Longevity Are Substantially Inflated due to Assortative Mating.

If you need a paper, Sci-Hub.

Linking Branch Lengths Across Loci Provides the Best Fit for Phylogenetic Inference.

Shades of complexity: New perspectives on the evolution andgenetic architecture of human skin.

A Two-Player Iterated Survival Game.

Cultural Selection Shapes Network Structure.

A new blog, Academic Parents. Two of my kids were born during graduate school. I was not the primary caregiver at all, and obviously did not give birth to them. But it was somewhat difficult still. Can’t imagine if I was the one taking care of the newborn.

It’s also nice to see people starting blogs. Both Twitter and YouTube streaming have replaced the “voice” that blogging gave random people, but both media are relatively vapid and shallow compared to having to write down your thoughts.

Bob Trivers’ Natural Selection and Social Theory is now a free PDF. Highly recommend this book. Trivers is an engaging writer.

Last week I made a bet with a friend that Republicans would gain one seat in the Senate, and Democrats would gain the House. Looks like I won that bet.

 

Open Thread, 11/4/2018

So in a few days everyone can stop pretending to be cut-rate Nate Silvers.

My prediction: Dems will take the House. But Republicans will make a gain of +1 in the Senate.

Pakistan’s Hybrid Government and the Aasia Bibi Fiasco.. Basically, reasonable people in Pakistan are terrified about being openly reasonable, lest the crazy minority kill them. Another thing is that the details of what this woman did is irrelevant now, she’s a symbol. We’ve seen this in the United States: feelings don’t care about your facts.

DNA Sequencing Giant Illumina Will Buy Pacific Biosciences For $1.2 Billion – Exclusive CEO Interview. I think this is precautionary.

Half of Americans believe in ghosts…

Least-cost pathway models indicate northern human dispersal from Sunda to Sahul.

Inferring the ancestry of everyone. “We introduce an algorithm to infer whole-genome history which has comparable accuracy to the state-of-the-art but can process around four orders of magnitude more sequences.”

Largest genome-wide association study for PTSD identifies genetic risk loci in European and African ancestries and implicates novel biological pathways.

Many options, few solutions: over 60 million years snakes converged on a few optimal venom formulations.

Genetic Consequences of Social Stratification in Great Britain. This is obviously triggering discussion. But please note this preprint is the beginning of a conversation, not the closure on anything.

Species limits in butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): Reconciling classical taxonomy with the multispecies coalescent.

Again, Tim Blanning’s Frederick The Great is interesting as both biography and history of 18th century Prussia. The book has the subtitle “King of Prussia,” but if Blanning was in it for the clicks, it would be “The Gay Atheist Autocrat.”

Open Thread, 10/28/2018

An old friend from college has a new book out, Augmented Mind: AI, Superhumans, and the Next Economic Revolution. This looks to be in Jim Miller territory.

Sex in humans may not be binary, but it’s surely bimodal. Jerry Coyne is a well known evolutionary biologist who is also a vocal atheist. He’s now emeritus from the University of Chicago, and so I feel he’s kind of “out of step” with the culture. For example, within this post, which I generally agree with, he uses the term “transsexual” when most academics would use “transgender” to mean what he means. A lot of biologists don’t comment on this issue for two reasons. First, it’s politically fraught and you can’t really win. Second, the terms, norms, and frameworks are changing fast and constantly, so that people don’t even know what they’re addressing.

Speaking of fraught, the first robust SNP hits for male nonheterosexual behavior were reported at ASHG. The preprint should be out in less than four months. Antonio Regalado has already reported on it, Genes linked to being gay may help straight people get more sex. We plan to interview one of the authors on our podcast.

Recently talked to some people from Andy Kern’s lab about implications of Wright-Fisher vs. non-Wright-Fisher models in terms of spatial heterogeneity. It really makes me excited for the “forward simulation revolution.” Talking to people in evolutionary genomics that isn’t focused on getting NIH grants for human research, and it is clear why Matt Hahn has stated that there’s already enough data produced for many years to come.

A Tentative OUT OF INDIA Model To Explain The Origin & Spread Of INDO-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES. I’m skeptical of the conclusion, but this post has a lot of interesting information. Additionally, I think that AASI ancestry is going to be found in the Indus Valley between 3000 and 2000 BC…but I’m not totally sure. Johanna Nichols’ work is recommended though.

The Fifth Column podcast talks to Sarah Haider. In general, I’m a fan of the podcast.

Recently I’ve been thinking about China and Saudi Arabia. Recently we’re looking skeptically at our elite’s ties with Saudi Arabia. But what about China? Many researchers and businesspeople “have” to work with China, and unlike Saudi Arabia, it seems implausible that we can “avoid” interactions. But there are plenty of human rights issues with the Chinese state. The only conclusion I draw is that people need to be careful about getting on their high horses. Researchers who criticize working with the Saudis or in Israel should also consider them working with Chinese colleagues who are under the purview of a problematic state…but that penalize their Chinese colleagues, and would be harder and harder to maintain over the years.

Fast Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure.

The truth behind America’s most famous gay-hate murder. The media and the mainstream institutions basically colluded to create a narrative more politically convenient. Are we surprised?

15,000 Year Old Spearpoints Reveal Details About The Peopling Of The Americas.

When It Comes to Sleep, One Size Fits All.

Rare genetic sequences illuminate early humans’ history in Africa

The Blanning Frederick the Great book really is good. Though some of you might want to speed through the details of campaigns (and some of you may not).

Open Thread, 10/21/2018

You may have noticed I haven’t been posting much. Busy with other things, like ASHG, work, family, etc. I don’t normally post “won’t be posting often” notices, as no one really cares much about blogs…but when I go into lower production mode people sometimes worry. No reason to worry.

Tim Blanning’s Frederick the Great: King of Prussia is an excellent book. So is The Pursuit of Glory: The Five Revolutions that Made Modern Europe: 1648-1815. Finally, Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600–1947. One of the most interesting things about Frederick the Great: King of Prussia is how Blanning recounts the importance of personally playing and repeatedly listening to music in the life of the German monarch. He was apparently a very competent flutist.

There was talk about ASHG about the Amy Harmon article, Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed). It seems most of the geneticists I know personally were contacted by Harmon at some point over the last two years. A lot of work went into this. Many of our quotes were obviously not used. That’s called journalism.

There was a period when many frog-Nazis were on Twitter brandishing a particular STRUCTURE bar plot (since frog-Nazism has been severely purged by Twitter I see this far less often). I understand that many journalists and people of the “chattering-thinking” classes are strongly influenced by what they see on Twitter in terms of their perception of what’s going on in the world.

Additionally, to be honest for many white people racism is somewhat an abstraction. They need to make recourse to instrumental variables. The SNL election night sketch which shows white liberals talking about how it’s never been so bad, and black comedians nodding along, illustrates a real trend, and that is that many white liberals feel like there has been a massive upsurge of racism over the past few years.* But as a nonwhite person who has lived in this country since the early 1980s, it is clear that America is far less racist than it was back then, and our society has been defined by a gradual decrease in racial prejudice. White support for laws banning interracial marriage went from about 25% in the 1980s to 10% in 2002, when the question stopped being asked because it was such a marginal viewpoint.

A story about the social and political of implications evolutionary population genetics is a reasonable one. And, it might make a somewhat interesting academic paper as well. But the prominence of this piece to me cuts to a deep disagreement about the nature of racial conflict and difference within human societies. Immanuel Kant’s abstract and intellectual reflections on race may be alarmingly white supremacist to many moderns, but the profitable character of exploitation of sugar and the utility of slavery in the West Indies, and the rise of the West in a much more robust manner as signified by the McCartney Mission in the 1790s, was far more important in shaping the emergence of a very vigorous white supremacist ideology in the late 19th century which culminated in Madison Grant and Lothrop Stoddard.

I enjoy discourses on the intersection of race and genetics as much as the next person. I write them myself. But the most concrete thing I can do for the “racial question” is what I’m doing already: participating in the amalgamation of very distinct pedigrees and producing Americans related to a much larger fraction of the world’s population. White Americans who believe in the cause of racial social justice and anti-racism can do something very easily if they so choose: select a non-white partner and produce mixed children. If you are already partnered up, encourage your children to do so. This will make a bigger difference than retweeting how great diversity is, while not living it in your own life. For white progressives, do understand that your nonwhite allies notice the overwhelming pallor of the types of people who become and remain your intimates. You spend an afternoon on a racially diverse panel. Why not spend life in a racially diverse manner? Because I am a political outsider to these issues nonwhites probably feel more comfortable telling me how they perceive you don’t have much skin in the game. An ounce of action is worth a pound of talk (also, you can proactively give money to nonwhite people from your own disposable income).

The above is not a troll at all. I’m not the sort of person who thinks that the type of person another human being becomes friends with, or partners with, is my business. Do as you wish. But if you accept the premises of most forms of anti-racist talk, then Norman Podhoretz’s 1963 essay which enjoins action still applies.

The Uralic podcast is up. Brown Pundits now have a podcast.

This Elizabeth Warren fact-check by the Daily Caller Foundation’s Emily Larsen is pretty good. Having to listen to political pundits talk about ancestry testing all week has been painful. More need for education….

ASHG photo that I find most amusing.

As most of you probably know, the human genome still has gaps. I felt this year more people talked about those gaps, and how to fill them in. Also, lots of African genetics (this was by plan).

May write some more tutorials soon. Depends on the time.

The Slow Burn podcast ended with talking about Juanita Broderick. The Broderick allegations really have shot into prominence over the last few years. But if the Republicans knew about them in detail, that does make their determination to impeach Bill Clinton far more comprehensible.

I don’t have much to say about the Khashoggi thing you haven’t heard elsewhere.

A new analysis of CEU mutation rates is there is an age effect, most mutations are paternal, and, there might be variation in increases in mutations with older individuals by family.

* Most of my white friends tend to point to particular media anecdotes. As a nonwhite person I have not perceived any difference, and I travel in various parts of the country. Your experience may vary.

Open Thread, 10/15/2018


I pinned the above chart to my Twitter profile because I’m “trying to make it happen.” It was David Mittelman’s idea, and the data was courtesy of ISOGG, but putting it together as a graph has really brought home to people how the consumer genomic landscape has changed over the last half a decade.

The plot to the right, which shows a smoothed chart of the total number of kits over time, is also important.

I recorded a podcast for the Urbane Cowboys last week. It should go up today, so watch for it. I talked about a variety of topics, so I don’t know how it will drop in regards to editing.

Was talking to a friend about the importance of emotion in reasoning, or at least how emotion allows us to reason better. He asked about books, and Descartes’ Error came to mind. But I’ve read about critiques of its interpretation of the history of science and philosophy, though I think the big picture conclusion is probably still valid.

Will be at ASHG this week. Mostly I’m going to learn more about African genomics. Not as much on pop-gen as in previous years. If I approach your poster, don’t worry that I’m going to tweet or write about. Just be cool.

Noticed Tim Blanning’s massive survey of Frederick the Great is now less than $10 on Kindle. Because of the World Wars, I think we learn a lot less about Prussia from 1700 on than we otherwise would. Blanning’s The Pursuit of Glory: The Five Revolutions that Made Modern Europe: 1648-1815 is also excellent.

I’m listening to John Keegan’s A History of Warfare on Audible. To be honest I think I’m much better at reading than listening. This shouldn’t be surprising. In courses, I generally prefer to learn from the textbook as opposed to listening to lectures. And I have a lot of experience reading over my lifetime. Less so listening.

Xunzi: The Complete Text has been a difficult read for me. I’ve gone back and reread passages several times. It is definitely on the discursive side. That being said, I have come to a strange observation: Xunzi’s view of religion is similar to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s. Here from the Stanford Encylopedia of Religion:

He opposed interpretations of religion that emphasize doctrine or philosophical arguments intended to prove God’s existence, but was greatly drawn to religious rituals and symbols, and considered becoming a priest. He likened the ritual of religion to a great gesture, as when one kisses a photograph. This is not based on the false belief that the person in the photograph will feel the kiss or return it, nor is it based on any other belief. Neither is the kiss just a substitute for a particular phrase, like “I love you.” Like the kiss, religious activity does express an attitude, but it is not just the expression of an attitude in the sense that several other forms of expression might do just as well….

This seems similar to Xunzi’s belief that religious rituals were an important part of life, even if supernatural beings did not exist. Though Wittgenstein seems to have had some sort of fundamental mystical religious beliefs, whereas Xunzi was more of a naturalist.

The whale shark genome reveals how genomic and physiological properties scale with body size. Dim on comparative genomics. But I do like sharks.

Harvard and the Brigham call for more than 30 retractions of cardiac stem cell research. The medical science literature is going to yield a lot of problems sooner than later.

Estimation of allele-specific fitness effects across human protein-coding sequences and implications for disease.

The Democrats Have a Latino Problem Hispanic voters were supposed to be the party’s future. It’s not working out that way.

Jason Collin’s on global fertility projections.

Bayesian Estimation of Species Divergence Times Using Correlated Quantitative Characters.

Hidden ‘risk’ in polygenic scores: clinical use today could exacerbate health disparities.

Identity inference of genomic data using long-range familial searches. If they solve the Zodiac killer, forget about the worries.

Inferring Demography and Selection in Organisms Characterized by Skewed Offspring Distributions.

Adaptive walks on high-dimensional fitness landscapes and seascapes with distance-dependent statistics.

Existence and implications of population variance structure.

Megalakes in the Sahara? A Review.

On this week’s episode of The Insight we’re talking about the genetics of the Uralic peoples, and Finns in particular.

Have you been noticing more intrusive and stranger advertisements in the media? That’s because it’s in trouble. The whole sector. But you knew that.

On Eve of Harvard Bias Trial, Dueling Rallies Show Rifts Among Asian-Americans. The pro-Harvard Asians seem to have memorized zingers from Between the World and Me. They may be pro-social justice, but they’re still Asians, so no creativity!

Open Thread, 10/8/2018

Paul Romer won the Nobel. Not a big surprise. David Warsh’s Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery is pretty good. I recommend it. I would read it in concert with Hive Mind: How Your Nation’s IQ Matters So Much More Than Your Own and A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World (Warsh wrote a negative review of the second book and likely would not be a fan of the first).

Analyses of Neanderthal introgression suggest that Levantine and southern Arabian populations have a shared population history. Bigger Yemeni data set. Yemeni and Levantine populations seem quite similar….

As you may not know Google+ was finally given an explicit sunset schedule. Google tried twice to tackle Facebook but failed both times. But it turns out that Facebook may never have a successor. A centralized social-graph has weaknesses, and younger cohorts seem to be creating segmentation. Their parents are on Facebook, so they have a nominal Facebook account. But the real action is on other platforms.

Life on the Dirtiest Block in San Francisco. Having drinks with friends at the top of hotels and high rise condominium complexes makes you forget that far below the homeless have come out and taken over the night.

Why most narrative history is wrong. First, this seems to be more about ‘popular’ history today, and the mainstream of past history. One reason contemporary academic history is so boring for most people is that it resists grand narrative temptation.

With that being said, this is more of an indictment on modern journalism.

Quantifying how constraints limit the diversity of viable routes to adaptation.

A Simulation-Based Evaluation of Total-Evidence Dating Under the Fossilized Birth-Death Process.

Expanded Pre-Implantation Genomic Testing.

Fudged statistics on the Iraq War death toll are still circulating today. Do you remember this debate more than ten years ago? I do. The very assertion of these numbers distorted the discourse. This was just a prefiguring of the media landscape today. It’s mostly propaganda.

Phylogeny, ancestors and anagenesis in the hominin fossil record.

The genetic relationship between female reproductive traits and six psychiatric disorders.

In case my Twitter account gets deleted, remember you can subscribe to my RSS or follow my Facebook page.

ASHG Meeting next week.

Max Boot is making the rounds promoting his new book, The Corrosion of Conservatism: Why I Left the Right. I haven’t read the book, but having listened to him on various podcasts, one thing that annoys me about this guy: his faction of maximalist neoconservatives and war-hawks in the post-9/11 era were cheering on the mass psychosis which led to this nation backing multiple military adventures. In particular, I’m talking about the invasion of Iraq, which cost $2 trillion dollars, 4,500 American soldiers’ lives, and hundreds of thousands of Iraqi lives.

Instead of starting in 2015, he should start in 2003.