Razib Khan’s raw genotype data on 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, Geno 2.0 and Ancestry

It has been a while since I posted an update on my genotype. Since then I’ve been tested on most of the major platforms. I don’t see any harm in releasing this to the public or researchers who want to look at it (though I don’t know why anyone would).

You can download all the files here.

Having my genotypes public is pretty useful for me. If I inquire about someone’s genetics oftentimes people get weirdly defense and ask “what about you?” I Just invite them to look at my raw data and analyze it for themselves! I’m not a hypocrite about this.

Over the years I’ve had researchers inquire about my ethnicity when they stumble upon my genotype on platforms such as openSNP. So in full disclosure, most of my ancestry is pretty standard eastern Bengali. I’m more East Asian shifted than most Bangladeshi samples in the 1000 Genomes project, but then my family is from Comilla, in the far east of eastern Bengal (anyone who cares, my Y is of course R1a1a-Z93 and my mtDNA U2b).

As before I’ll put the genotype under a Creative Commons license:Creative Commons License

My son in the genetics history books

Just saw today that my son’s prenatal sequencing was mentioned in DNA: The Story of the Genetic Revolution:

The ethics of sequencing a presumably health fetus will be debated for years to come. But the day of doing is already here. Razib Khan, a thirty-something graduate student and blogger, decided to sequence his first child’s genome while his wife was still pregnant. Although one instance of whole-genome sequencing in utero was reported in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2012, that had been done to supplement a positive cytogenetic result….

I want to correct the record for future printings: my first son was my second child. And, it was not my decision, it was our decision. My wife was an equal partner, and did as much behind the scenes in making the sequencing happen.

23andMe ancestry only is $49.99 for Prime Day


23andMe has gone below $50 for “Prime Day”! For those of us who bought kits (albeit more fully featured) at $399 or even more this is pretty incredible. But from what I’m to understand these sorts of SNP-chips are now possible to purchase from Illumina for well less than $50 so this isn’t charitable.

At minimum a way to get a raw genotype you can bank later.